Snow Days….

Snow days are a lot less fun as an adult. At least, when you’re an adult who is home alone while her girlfriend is at work.  I’m in one of those contrarian moods that says, “I want to go out and do stuff — despite the fact I’m staying home because I didn’t want to drive into work because it is a white fluffy hell outside.”

(The reason the GF is at work and I am at home is because her work is literally a two minute drive from our house so I was able to drop her off without having to go very far.  And she was nice enough to tell me that I should stay home because well, see the ‘white fluffy hell’ comment.)

It doesn’t help that the graphic novel I was reading is currently stuck in the dang car because I am too lazy to go out and get it.  Also, it is too cold. And there’s snow. Lots of snow. Multiple inches of it! Auugh!   Then again, being home alone might not be the best time to be reading the third Hack/Slash omnibus about the famous slasher slayer Cassie Hack and her buddy Vlad.

I read the 2-4th graphic novels in the Irredeemable/Incorruptible series yesterday at work. The library is, of course, closed today so I cannot get my fix for tonight but hopefully tomorrow I can pick up the rest of both series.  I read the books in alternating order — #1 of Irredeemable followed by #1 of Incorruptible and then #2 of Irredeemable and so forth.

On the plus side, I do still have episodes of Human Target to watch and I stocked up on food last night on the way home from work, just in case the both of us were stuck here tonight.

Otherwise, I’m being lazy tonight, noodling some back-story stuff for Gem City and watching a documentary about DC comics villains (Necessary Evil: Super-Villains of DC Comics).   They’re talking about Batman’s Rogue’s Gallery of villains at the moment and how characters like Bane and the Riddler came to Gotham City to challenge Batman, to see if he was something that could stand up to them and give them something interesting to do.  Which makes me wonder if a lot of villains aren’t like evil versions of Phineas and Ferb, looking for something to do to keep them occupied during summer vacation.

The other point the documentary has brought up is the idea that the villains are the ones who DO things while the heroes are the ones who react to the things that the villains do. You don’t just see this in villain/hero dichotomies either; in comedy there’s the concept of the Straight Man — i.e. the guy/gal/robotic shrimp who sets up the joke for the Funny Man — think Bud Abbot of Abbot and Costello or Jerry Seinfeld on Seinfeld.  In the cartoons of my childhood, you had leader characters like Optimus Prime or Duke of GI Joe who were essentially the Straight Man of their team — they existed to be the calm moral center of the team and to allow everybody else to run around and be weird and/or quirky.

Documentary just talked about the idea that ‘everyone is the hero in their own story’ — the idea that, if we looked at the story from the villain’s point of view, they would be the hero and the hero would be the villain.  I can remember being about 12 or 13 and watching the original A-Team on tv and realizing, to my utter amazement, that the guys who we were being shown were the heroes of the piece were really a pack of criminals running from a legitimate agent of the law.   It didn’t stop me from rooting for the A-Team (I had such a crush on Murdock…), but it did add a layer of grey to what was essentially a live action comic book.

Ooog…there are more thinky thoughts coming to me, but I am too tired in the brain to be coherent about them. I think I need to chew on them a bit.

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