Oh, where is my Facebook? Oh, where is my Facebook? — No, seriously, where is my Facebook!?

Sing my pain, Larry the Cucumber!

So, if you’ve been on the internet today, you probably know that Facebook is experiencing an outage. I went and made a meme about it because that’s the level of creativity that my brain’s at right now. Which is annoying as hell since…

Because shut up that’s why, Junior Asparagus, you goody-goody little….

*cough* I mean, I *have* been writing. I’ve been working pretty diligently on Storm Warnings and it’s been a bit of a slog. I’m still pretty much at the beginning of the story, much to my annoyance. When I originally came up with this idea, it seemed so damned simple. Like, I knew exactly what I wanted to write and where I wanted to go with it — well, except for the ending. I had no idea how the story was going to end. I’m good at ideas, I’m good at beginnings and I’m decent at middles but endings are my Waterloo.

I might be willing to trade my bellybutton for an ending. Actually, several endings.

Though, in all honesty, my original plan for the story was good but it wasn’t complete. For one thing, I didn’t have any idea why my heroes were getting involved in the story’s main conflict. Or, more accurately, no idea beyond “I, the author, have assembled you in this scene because this is where I want you to be so you can do the things that will get the story running so ok, you’re here, start doing the things!”

And, the characters did do the things. Except that the things they did were just not good. I went through probably half a dozen rewrites of the opening scenes to try and get Storm Warnings to a point where it was something I liked and that felt right. And every time I thought I had it, it would slip away and I’d be back at square one.

I didn’t alter this one because this is pretty much how the plot of Storm Warnings has been treating me. Minus the cute little French accents.

This past week, the whole “Hey, why are the characters actually doing any of this?” thing occurred to me in a big way. So, I set down to try and figure it out.

And I’m kinda happy with what I’ve come up with. It’s a good idea, I think. Or at least a good first-draft fourth-draft idea. It doesn’t just give the characters a reason to be in the scene, it also gives them some actual stakes in the story — which is a good thing, since I want these characters to come across as real people, fighting against the evils of their day, not plaster saints who are above everything and judging others from on high.

So, this is a long, rambling, roundabout way of saying this: writing is hard. Having a plan before you start can serve as a map through unfamiliar territory, but sometimes the map doesn’t mention that the bridge you were expecting to be there was wiped out by a flood.

I knew Storm Warnings was going to be tricky to write for a few reasons:

  1. It’s set in an alternate universe with superpowers and magic and aliens and all the other comic book superhero tropes that show up in Omegas: Cake Walk and the other stories that I’m setting in Universe-46534. — so there’s the need to balance those elements and keep them plausible and believable
  2. I’m introducing not one, not two, but four main heroes as well as an equal number of secondary heroes/characters who will Be Significant In the Future. — Yeahhh, really not sure how I thought I could fit all that in 6,000 words. That was like, wow…yeah.
  3. While this is actually the third story I’ve started in this universe, it’s chronologically the first story to take place in Universe-46534. The characters being introduced will be historical figures in other stories. They’re the original heroes of this world — well, among the original heroes. So…yeah, that’s tricky!
  4. It’s set in the past — specifically, in 1937, so I’m having to check things to make sure that I’m getting details right. On the other hand, the fact that this is an alternate universe, I’ve got some wiggle room for certain things.
  5. The bad guys are literally Nazis. — They’re based on a couple different pro-fascist/pro-Nazi groups that were active in America in the 1930s and 1940s. The trickiest part about them is not turning them into cartoonish mustache-twirling bad guys.
  6. The good guys are from backgrounds that are different from my own — two characters are gay, there’s a few Jewish characters (including some Jewish mobsters who are very happy to get the chance to kick Nazi ass — which is also historically accurate). This, along with the historical setting, adds a couple levels of difficulty.

But, see, I’ve accepted this challenge and I’m going to keep working on it. Because I think this’ll be a good story once it’s finally done. I like the characters, I like the plot I have set up and I like this universe. It’s just sometimes, it’s hard to see the path because it hasn’t been cleared yet. And you’re the one who has to clear it. With an ax. Not a big ax either. A little rinky-dinky ax up against a redwood tree the size of an aircraft carrier or something.


Note: Instagram is also down but I don’t use Instagram so I’m not making VeggieTales themed memes about it.

Other Writing Blather — I am meeting and/or exceeding my goals for the 365 Day Challenge. For the year to date, I’m at 50,000 words! Yay me!


Boilerplate Links:  

A Round of Words in 80 Days is the writing challenge that knows you have a life. If you want to join, you can at any time.Set the goals you want to accomplish and get and give encouragement to fellow ROWers. Feel free to join us on Facebook at ROW80 or follow us on Twitter at #ROW80.  Or you can do all of the above!

Visit 10 Minute Novelists on Facebook or visit the lady who started it all, Katharine Grubb and learn more. You can also learn more about the 365 Day Challenge — which is closed for 2019, but you can prepare for 2020!

1/1/2019 — First Post: Begin As You Mean To Go On

Ok, first post of the new year! Wherein I shall outline my plans for 2019 in the hopes that putting it out into the universe will help me keep myself accountable in the coming months.

First things first: this year, I’m doing the 2019 iteration of the 365 Writing Challenge, which is sponsored by 10 Minute Novelists, a writers group that is centered around the idea that big goals can be achieved in small steps. In the words of Katharine Grubb, who initially developed the plan that turned into the book Write a Novel in 10 Minutes a Day, that eventually inspired the Facebook group:

I developed this system because I wanted to do it all. I wanted to give all to my family and pursue my writing dreams. I knew that if I looked for big chunks of time, it would never come.So my theory was that ten minutes were better than none at all. And if I did this six times, I would have written for an hour.

http://www.10minutenovelists.com/write-a-novel-in-ten-minutes/

NOTE: If you’re wanting to participate in the 365 Day Challenge, it’s currently closed for 2019 but what you can do is join 10 Minute Novelists over at Facebook and see if the group is a good fit for you — and prep for 2020!

I’ve done the 365 Day Challenge before — trying for the goal of writing at least once per day for 365 days (actually, I think that year was a leap year so 366 days). I came pretty close, but I did miss the odd day here and there and most of the writing I did was personal journaling and research notes. This time around, I’m hoping to create actual works of fiction and maybe the odd non-fiction essay/thought piece as well.

This year, the Challenge offered some different options, including the ability to choose how many days per week you wanted to commit to writing, how many words per week, etc. Toward that end, I’ve set myself a goal of 2,500 words/week and to writing at least 4 days per week. Which works out to writing 625 words on each of those 4 days or writing 357 words a day for 7 days. Or, obviously, any combination thereof.

This goal is admittedly a pretty low hurdle for me. I can write 2,500 words in a couple of hours if I get going (and if I’m typing, but even writing by hand 2,500 words is achievable within a day). There’s a reason I’m setting this goal low and it’s pretty much a take on Grubb’s reasoning: small goals are achievable. In addition, achieving one goal encourages you (or in this case, me) to achieve the next goal, which leads to achieving the next goal and the goal after that and the one after that and then the next thing you know, you’ve got a whole big stack of goals piled up around you like a goal-hoarding dragon.

The goal combination is also, I’m hoping, ideal for fitting in with the rest of my life. My job duties have changed drastically, which means that I have less downtime at work — which is when I used to do a lot of my writing. On the upside, I’m getting better about scheduling things that need to be done so I just need to start applying those skills to writing as well.

# # # # #

I’m also still participating in A Round of Words in 80 Days — The Writing Challenge That Knows You Have a Life — which, like the 365 Day Challenge, lets you set your own goals and isn’t focused around writing novels like, say, Nanowrimo (though Camp Nanowrimo, which is in April and July, does something similar).

Though, as another aside, Nanowrimo itself isn’t exactly strict about policing how people participate — the main idea is that you challenge yourself, see what you can accomplish and if you win, you win! And if you don’t win, you’re still further along than you were on October 31st, so booyeah and rock on, you crazy diamond.

If you want to participate in A Round of Words in 80 Days, you can jump in at any time. They do ask that you have a blog — but it can be a pretty basic blog (like, say, this one).

# # # # #

Another requirement for AROW80 is that you have specific, measurable goals for each round and that you post them in your blog (which is why you need a blog). So, since the first round of 2019 started yesterday here’s my goals for this round:

  • Finish Storm Warnings — which I have now started about five times, but I’m currently working on a draft that I’m liking. Writing short is freaking hard, people.
  • Finish Omegas: Cake Walk — which is still in the same limbo it’s been in for the last few months.
  • Post in my blog at least weekly as part of my checking in with AROW80.
  • Post and track my progress in the 365 Day Challenge on the group’s spreadsheet.
  • Write at least 4 times a week and produce a total of at least 2,500 words.

# # # # #

Overall Goals for 2019: Finish SOMETHING — specifically, finish at least one of my current projects, preferably before the end of the first round of AROW80 (which is March 21st, 2019). Specifically, finish Storm Warnings by the end of this month since I’m working against a deadline on that.

And speaking of which, I’m going to close out here and get to work on Storm Warnings.

# # # # #

Boilerplate Links:  

A Round of Words in 80 Days is the writing challenge that knows you have a life. If you want to join, you can at any time.Set the goals you want to accomplish and get and give encouragement to fellow ROWers. Feel free to join us on Facebook at ROW80 or follow us on Twitter at#ROW80.  Or you can do all of the above!

Visit 10 Minute Novelists on Facebook or visit the lady who started it all, Katharine Grubb and learn more.