AROW80 Update for April 14, 2019

This is going to be a quick update because I want to go take a nap. We’re in the middle of a tornado watch here because of course we are, this is Ohio, it’s mid-April, it is the time of the big winds!  Also, weather in general is just going completely nucking futz lately.

Haven’t done much of anything on Storm Warnings, though I’ve been watching a documentary about the eugenics movement of the early 20th century as part of my on-going research for certain aspects of this story and for the story universe as a whole.

Been chugging along with writing every day, not always related to Storm Warnings or any other project but I’m getting words on paper and trying to write in a more structured way.

Uhmmmm, anything else? Not much. Going to go take that nap now, catch you guys on the flip-flop! Have a good week, hope the weather where you are is behaving itself in a reasonable fashion.

Oh! One last thought and something I will try to get back to in a longer fashion at another time: I have discovered that when I’m setting goals for myself, it’s a good idea to set them fairly low. The lower the goal, the easier it is to achieve and the more likely I am to inadvertently exceed it. Which leads to me feeling accomplishment and wanting to do even better the next time, thus do we successfully condition ourselves to achieve!

Ok, now it’s nap time

# # # # #

Boilerplate Links:  

A Round of Words in 80 Days is the writing challenge that knows you have a life. If you want to join, you can at any time.Set the goals you want to accomplish and get and give encouragement to fellow ROWers. Feel free to join us on Facebook at ROW80 or follow us on Twitter at#ROW80.  Or you can do all of the above!

Visit 10 Minute Novelists on Facebook or visit the lady who started it all, Katharine Grubb and learn more.

Oh, where is my Facebook? Oh, where is my Facebook? — No, seriously, where is my Facebook!?

Sing my pain, Larry the Cucumber!

So, if you’ve been on the internet today, you probably know that Facebook is experiencing an outage. I went and made a meme about it because that’s the level of creativity that my brain’s at right now. Which is annoying as hell since…

Because shut up that’s why, Junior Asparagus, you goody-goody little….

*cough* I mean, I *have* been writing. I’ve been working pretty diligently on Storm Warnings and it’s been a bit of a slog. I’m still pretty much at the beginning of the story, much to my annoyance. When I originally came up with this idea, it seemed so damned simple. Like, I knew exactly what I wanted to write and where I wanted to go with it — well, except for the ending. I had no idea how the story was going to end. I’m good at ideas, I’m good at beginnings and I’m decent at middles but endings are my Waterloo.

I might be willing to trade my bellybutton for an ending. Actually, several endings.

Though, in all honesty, my original plan for the story was good but it wasn’t complete. For one thing, I didn’t have any idea why my heroes were getting involved in the story’s main conflict. Or, more accurately, no idea beyond “I, the author, have assembled you in this scene because this is where I want you to be so you can do the things that will get the story running so ok, you’re here, start doing the things!”

And, the characters did do the things. Except that the things they did were just not good. I went through probably half a dozen rewrites of the opening scenes to try and get Storm Warnings to a point where it was something I liked and that felt right. And every time I thought I had it, it would slip away and I’d be back at square one.

I didn’t alter this one because this is pretty much how the plot of Storm Warnings has been treating me. Minus the cute little French accents.

This past week, the whole “Hey, why are the characters actually doing any of this?” thing occurred to me in a big way. So, I set down to try and figure it out.

And I’m kinda happy with what I’ve come up with. It’s a good idea, I think. Or at least a good first-draft fourth-draft idea. It doesn’t just give the characters a reason to be in the scene, it also gives them some actual stakes in the story — which is a good thing, since I want these characters to come across as real people, fighting against the evils of their day, not plaster saints who are above everything and judging others from on high.

So, this is a long, rambling, roundabout way of saying this: writing is hard. Having a plan before you start can serve as a map through unfamiliar territory, but sometimes the map doesn’t mention that the bridge you were expecting to be there was wiped out by a flood.

I knew Storm Warnings was going to be tricky to write for a few reasons:

  1. It’s set in an alternate universe with superpowers and magic and aliens and all the other comic book superhero tropes that show up in Omegas: Cake Walk and the other stories that I’m setting in Universe-46534. — so there’s the need to balance those elements and keep them plausible and believable
  2. I’m introducing not one, not two, but four main heroes as well as an equal number of secondary heroes/characters who will Be Significant In the Future. — Yeahhh, really not sure how I thought I could fit all that in 6,000 words. That was like, wow…yeah.
  3. While this is actually the third story I’ve started in this universe, it’s chronologically the first story to take place in Universe-46534. The characters being introduced will be historical figures in other stories. They’re the original heroes of this world — well, among the original heroes. So…yeah, that’s tricky!
  4. It’s set in the past — specifically, in 1937, so I’m having to check things to make sure that I’m getting details right. On the other hand, the fact that this is an alternate universe, I’ve got some wiggle room for certain things.
  5. The bad guys are literally Nazis. — They’re based on a couple different pro-fascist/pro-Nazi groups that were active in America in the 1930s and 1940s. The trickiest part about them is not turning them into cartoonish mustache-twirling bad guys.
  6. The good guys are from backgrounds that are different from my own — two characters are gay, there’s a few Jewish characters (including some Jewish mobsters who are very happy to get the chance to kick Nazi ass — which is also historically accurate). This, along with the historical setting, adds a couple levels of difficulty.

But, see, I’ve accepted this challenge and I’m going to keep working on it. Because I think this’ll be a good story once it’s finally done. I like the characters, I like the plot I have set up and I like this universe. It’s just sometimes, it’s hard to see the path because it hasn’t been cleared yet. And you’re the one who has to clear it. With an ax. Not a big ax either. A little rinky-dinky ax up against a redwood tree the size of an aircraft carrier or something.


Note: Instagram is also down but I don’t use Instagram so I’m not making VeggieTales themed memes about it.

Other Writing Blather — I am meeting and/or exceeding my goals for the 365 Day Challenge. For the year to date, I’m at 50,000 words! Yay me!


Boilerplate Links:  

A Round of Words in 80 Days is the writing challenge that knows you have a life. If you want to join, you can at any time.Set the goals you want to accomplish and get and give encouragement to fellow ROWers. Feel free to join us on Facebook at ROW80 or follow us on Twitter at #ROW80.  Or you can do all of the above!

Visit 10 Minute Novelists on Facebook or visit the lady who started it all, Katharine Grubb and learn more. You can also learn more about the 365 Day Challenge — which is closed for 2019, but you can prepare for 2020!

Starting Over, Again!

I went to the library today! Well, actually, I went to two different libraries today and did some writing at both of them! Not as much as I would have liked but I’m getting back into the swing of things so I am happy.

I also hit up a local grocery store and got some delicious roast turkey and a kaiser roll for lunch. Made an impromptu turkey sandwich in my car and munched on it while I watched the rain.

One thing I can say about Midwestern weather — don’t like it, you just have to wait for it to change. Last Saturday, we had six inches of snow, Sunday and Monday we had single-digit/sub-zero temperatures with high winds, Tuesday we had temperatures in the 30s, with a bit of rain and today we had rain and temperatures got into the high 40s/low 50s. Almost all the snow we had is now gone.

We’re not supposed to get more snow this weekend (I don’t think) but it’s going to get cold again. Yayyyyy. Then again, I have friends in Duluth who are seeing temps in the negative 30s so, I will not complain if I have to wear an extra sweatshirt this weekend.

# # # # #

Writing Goals: For the 365 Day Writing Challenge, I set a goal for myself of writing at least 4 days a week and writing at least 2,500 words per week. So far, I have been over my goals every week, both on words and on days! Happy me!

# # # # #

WIPpet Wednesday Math: (1+2+3) x 2 = 12 +1 9 = 31, so here are the first 31 paragraphs of the current draft of Storm Warnings:

One day, if he was very lucky, Louis Zane would meet Al Jolson and punch the Jazz Singer right square in the snoot. Maybe that would make them even for the fact Louis had had “April Showers” stuck in his head all evening.

The logical part of his mind conceded that this was as unlikely while his well-brought up side noted it was unfair. His pedantic nature wanted it noted that Al Jolson only sang the song – if anyone should get punched, it should be the guy who wrote it. Which set his curiosity to wondering who exactly that was?

One thing that the entire committee agreed on was this: punching Jolson, even in a fantasy, was still a better option than pasting one on his boss, who’d put the damn fool song in his head in the first place.

Either way, April could take its showers and the flowers that bloomed in May and shove them wherever it was that the moon went in June.

It didn’t help that his lower back was starting to join in the griping, adding its complaints about his decision to come traipsing out on a cold and drizzling April night, wasting his night off to come stare at what his strict Norwegian grandmother would have described as “a bunch of gruesomely heathenish gewgaws.” After all, he could have been back home in his apartment, nestled in his favorite chair, listening to The Rudy Vallée Show and rereading Thank You, Jeeves while getting on the outside of some decent scotch.

But instead, a pair of golden-brown eyes that were the polar opposite of roguish had asked him to come and he’d been powerless to say no to them.

“Lou? Are you all right?” said the thief who’d stolen Louis’s poor heart – and his night off – clean away. Oscar Miller looked over at Louis from where he’d been sketching one of the exhibition’s more heathenish treasures: a six-foot high pentagonal granite pillar carved with runes and designs.  “Is it your leg? Zeeskeit I told you not to wear those new shoes tonight. Do you need to sit down? There’s a bench around here some place.”

“No, it’s not my leg. My shoes are fine. I don’t need to sit down.” Louis wasn’t entirely lying. His leg wasn’t bothering him, not any more than it usually did and while he probably was going to regret wearing his new Oxfords, he didn’t need to sit down. “Remember, I grew up in the sticks. I used to walk five miles to school, one way, in snow up to my waist. Standing around the Shikagou Art Institute waiting for a lecture to start isn’t going to kill me.”

Oscar’s concern melted into a grin that could have made the May flowers bloom even without April showers. “It was three miles last time,” he said. “Uphill. Though the snow was only up to your knees.”

Louis returned Oscar’s grin, though his was the moon to Oscar’s sun. “Yeah, well, not all of us grew up soft like you, city boy,” he said. “Seriously, I’m fine. We’ll be sitting soon enough. Don’t worry about me, I’m just still peeved at Wallace.  The man’s a blister.”

Oscar’s smile dimmed, the sun going behind a cloud. “He’s still after you to do that interview with Goltz, isn’t he?” he asked. “It stinks that he’s not even giving you a choice.”

Louis shrugged. “Oh, he gave me a choice,” he said. “I can do the interview or I can clear out my desk. So, I’ll be doing the interview tomorrow evening. It’s going to be a slog, but I’ll pick up an extra bar of Lifebuoy and scrub myself extra hard afterwards.”

Oscar looked pained. “I’m sorry, Lou,” he said. “You could still tell him no—”

“—if I wanted my career to be as crippled as my leg is, sure,” Louis said, then sighed. “Which, believe me, I’ve considered, especially since listening to Goltz rattle on about how wonderful ‘der Furher’ is and how his German-American Peace Alliance is just a social club and not a bunch of Nazi boosters like the Silver Shirts or the Bund is going to seriously test my ability not to deck the fascist prick.”

Oscar chuckled. “Have I told you lately that I’m proud of you?” he said.

“Yeah, yeah,” Louis said. ““I’m just blowing off steam. I’m a big boy, if I didn’t want to talk to lame-brains and crackpots, I’d have stayed the hell out of journalism.  I’d be back on the dairy farm, staring at a cow’s backside instead of talking to a horse’s ass.  Enough about me; go back to enjoying the art.”

“You’re sure?” Oscar asked and for a brief, reckless moment, Louis considered ducking in to give Oscar a quick peck on the cheek.  Instead, he went with the better part of valor and smiled at him.

“Yeah, I’m sure. I’ll be fine.” Louis gestured at the pillar in front of them. “What’s the deal with this thing?”

Oscar’s enthusiasm crept back into his voice. “I’m really glad I brought my sketchbook. Some of these carvings are just incredible! You’d think they’d just been carved.”

“Really?” Louis edged closer to Oscar, leaning in to look more closely at the pillar. “You can tell just by looking?”

Oscar proceeded to point out various motifs and portions of the carving, gushing all the while about the use of line and form. Louis didn’t understand half of it – his appreciation for art didn’t extend much further than a deep-seated admiration for the illustrations in the Arrow Collar ads – but Oscar’s enjoyment was contagious. Especially when he shifted from discussing the art of the pillar to how he was planning on incorporating some of the designs into his latest comic strip.

“See, these look just like Martian hieroglyphics,” Oscar said, pointing at a group of runic carvings running up one face of the pillar.

“Speaking from experience, are you?” asked a voice that was as rich as cream and confident as Lou Gehrig playing stickball against a kindergarten class. Oscar’s eyes went wide and Louis turned to see what had stunned his companion to awestruck silence.

Grant Godiva would have turned heads even if he hadn’t been as rich as Masa Musa, even after the Crash of ’29. While he was touted in the press as a self-made millionaire, he’d started off with generous support from his inventor father, who’d turned a patent for a newfangled drill bit for oil fields into a lucrative business by leasing the part, rather than selling it. After his parents’ deaths, Godiva – then only a lad of seventeen – had gone on to sell the Godiva Tool and Die Company and used the money to found Magnum Enterprises, a holding company with interests in motion pictures, aeronautics, medical research, radio, newspapers and just about anything else that caught Godiva’s interest for more than five minutes. There were those who said the young man had really just created a way to print his own money, which seemed borne out by the fact that Godiva had brushed off the worst of the market crash like a bull brushing away a pesky fly.   Louis fought against his own impulse to gape like a hick just in from the sticks and turned his attention to the woman on Godiva’s arm.

Josephine Maxwell was the granddaughter of former slaves who’d become millionaires after achieving their freedom.  Her parents had both been born into wealthy families and had passed along not only that wealth but also a family tradition of hard work and social reform along with a not-inconsiderable fortune. Her father, Caleb Maxwell, held various business interests in Shikagou and throughout the rest of the United American States. Her mother, Martha, on the other hand, stuck closer to home, organizing various improving committees from the family’s Bronzeville neighborhood home while also finding time to run the Shikagou Crusader.  Josephine didn’t have a real job – instead, she did odd jobs for both of her parents, assisting them in various aspects of their financial and social obligations.

In addition to now being the second richest person Louis had ever met, Josephine Maxwell was also a tireless crusader for social justice and reform. While she’d always been involved in various causes, from women’s suffrage to the plight of the worker to racial equality, Josephine didn’t just march and hang up banners. Under her nom du masque, Belladonna, she fought crime and corruption on a much more direct level.

And over the last year or so, she’d roped Oscar and Louis – though not necessarily in that order — into her crusades as well. Louis helped mostly by funneling information her way – which had more to do with why he’d agreed to do the Goltz interview than his editor’s threats – while Oscar was serving as something between a partner and a protégé, working under the alias of The Green Carnation.

Tonight, all three of them were in civilian drag, having opted for a night at the museum to both enjoy the exhibition of Grant Godiva’s Britannic treasures and allow Josephine and Oscar to take a much-needed break from Oscar’s training. For his part, Louis was simply glad to have the opportunity to spend time with Oscar even if the venue wasn’t his first choice. Still, there was always the chance for a late-night supper at Hott Pepper’s Steak House over in Towertown.

 “Hello, Maxwell,” Louis said, giving Josephine a friendly, if somewhat curt nod. “I was wondering where you got off to. Didn’t know you ran in such exalted company. I’d have dressed better.”

Truth be told, Louis did feel more than a little shabby next to Josephine and Godiva – especially Godiva who was dressed to the nines and as handsome as a Michelangelo painting. If, say, Adam had climbed down from his fresco and climbed into a midnight blue suit pinstriped with gold thread, slicked back his hair and persuaded Mikey to sketch in a pencil-thin mustache.

Like Godiva, Josephine was dressed to impress in the height of fashion, but she drew the eye more because of how understated she was. Unlike Godiva’s top-dollar pin-striped suit, Josephine wore a simple tailored suit that was well-made but not flashy. The black-olive wool of the skirt and jacket contrasted well against both her chestnut brown skin and the tawny lion-yellow silk of her shirt.  While she wasn’t what Louis would have called classically beautiful, her features were strong in ways that would have been harsh on a woman with less presence.

# # # # #

This Week’s Goals:

  • Keep working on Storm Warnings
  • Be better about checking my personal email and visiting other members of AROW80 and WIPpet Wednesday

# # # # #

Boilerplate Links:  

A Round of Words in 80 Days is the writing challenge that knows you have a life. If you want to join, you can at any time.Set the goals you want to accomplish and get and give encouragement to fellow ROWers. Feel free to join us on Facebook at ROW80 or follow us on Twitter at#ROW80.  Or you can do all of the above!

Visit 10 Minute Novelists on Facebook or visit the lady who started it all, Katharine Grubb and learn more.

Visit The WIPpeteers for more information about WIPpet Wednesday

Quick Update for 1/6/2019

Seriously going to have to keep this fast because I literally have to leave for work in five minutes. So, here’s what’s up:

  • Still working on Storm Warnings — and I’m going to need to ramp up the speed on that if I’m going to meet the due date.
  • Considering taking part in Wattpad’s Open Novella Contest II — which would mean needing to write 2,000 words of an idea that fits one of their prompts by January 29th.
  • Needing to get back to Omegas: Cake Walk — which has no deadlines but my self-imposed one of getting the damned thing done this year.

Beyond that, all is well, hope you guys are having a good week. I did manage to hit my goals for the first week of the 365 Writing Challenge — here’s hoping for continued success in Week Two!

# # # # #

Boilerplate Links:  

A Round of Words in 80 Days is the writing challenge that knows you have a life. If you want to join, you can at any time.Set the goals you want to accomplish and get and give encouragement to fellow ROWers. Feel free to join us on Facebook at ROW80 or follow us on Twitter at#ROW80.  Or you can do all of the above!

Visit 10 Minute Novelists on Facebook or visit the lady who started it all, Katharine Grubb and learn more.